Recent studies have shown neurological differences in the way people visually process movement and patterns. It is possible that these differences could be explained by traits associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

About this study

This study will be investigating visual processing differences between typically developing individuals with low, medium or high Autism traits.

We are seeking participants who:

  • are aged between 18 and 30 years old
  • do not suffer from any neurological condition (such as epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, etc.)
  • have good (corrected) vision
  • have access to the internet.
     

What's involved?

As a participant, you will be asked to complete the Autism Quotient (AQ) questionnaire and a pattern game online. You will then be invited to download game software to a personal device and play five visual processing games from the comfort of your home! Based on your performance you may be invited to take part in the follow-up phase of this study.

Your participation in this study is an opportunity to expand current knowledge on ASD traits and the visual brain pathways affected by the disorder.

If you are interested in participating in this study or have any questions please contact the student investigators via the details below.

For further enquiries

Student investigators

Rebekah De Losa
102129732@student.swinburne.edu.au

Sam Spiteri
sspiteri@swinburne.edu.au


Supervisor

Professor David Crewther 
dcrewther@swinburne.edu.au

Our research ethics and integrity

Our researchers are committed to the highest ethical, professional and scholarly standards. All our studies conform to the Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research, Good Clinical Practice and the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research.

Contact the Centre for Human Psychopharmacology

There are many ways to engage with us. If your organisation is dealing with a complex problem, get in touch to discuss how we can work together to provide solutions. Call us on +61 3 9214 4444 or email chp@swinburne.edu.au

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