Energy Transformation Laboratory

Swinburne's Energy Transformation Laboratory is used for research and teaching in fluid dynamics. Located in the Advanced Manufacturing and Design Centre, it includes two facilities dedicated to renewable energy – the wave channel facility and the solar simulator, as well as a dedicated microfluidics room.

Applications for the lab include renewable and conventional energy industries, minerals, chemicals, pharmaceuticals and food processing industries, building services, civil and environmental engineering, aerospace technologies, transport technologies, defence systems, biomedical technologies and general manufacturing industries.

Wave channel facility

Swinburne’s 11 metre wave channel facility is presently the only wave-maker in Australia dedicated to ocean renewable energy. It is used for studies of the fundamental fluid dynamics of waves interacting with generic wave-energy converters. It is equipped with a new random wave maker developed with contributions from a Swinburne benefactor. A set of probes measures wave heights.

Contact Professor Richard Manasseh to find out more about the wave channel facility.

Microfluidics room

This facility is dedicated to the fabrication of microfluidic devices and related experiments, complementing Swinburne’s biomedical and microfluidic experimentation facilities in the Factory of the Future and ATC building Level 9. It is equipped with a fume cupboard, reticulation of gases and water, and is designed to accommodate class IV laser equipment.

Contact Professor Paul Stoddart or Professor Richard Manasseh to find out more about the microfluidics room.

Solar simulator

Swinburne’s solar simulator is one of only three of its kind in the world and is unique in Australia. It’s used to study the potential for solar energy to smelt metals. It includes an array of seven 6-kilowatt lamps that mimic the sun. Swinburne researchers designed the simulator with metal halide arc lamps, overcoming issues with other simulators elsewhere. Its extremely high temperatures (approaching 2000°C) allow applications to iron ore, glass or cement.

Contact Associate Professor Akbar Rhamdani or Professor Geoffrey Brooks to find out more about the solar simulator.

Robot fish tank

The robot fish tank has the capacity to enable the testing of depth control, obstacle avoidance and navigation capabilities of various underwater robot configurations including robot fish.

Contact Professor Romesh Nagarajah to find out more about the robot fish tank.

Swinburne on Scope TV

Professor Richard Manasseh explains how Swinburne University's wave channel facility is used for studies of the fundamental fluid dynamics of waves interacting with generic wave-energy converters.