Keynote presenters

Behaviour and design of steel and composite structures for the circular construction economy

Professor Brian Uy, University of Sydney, Australia

Brian Uy is Professor of Structural Engineering and Head of the School of Civil Engineering at the University of Sydney. He was previously Professor of Structural Engineering and Director of the Centre for Infrastructure Engineering and Safety (CIES) in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at The University of New South Wales from 2013-2016 and was awarded a Scientia Professorship from 2017-2022. Brian also holds an Adjunct Professor role within the School of Engineering and Information Technology at UNSW, Canberra (Australian Defence Force Academy (ADFA)).

Brian is a member of the ARC College of Experts for Engineering, Information and Computing Sciences for the period 2016-2018. He is Chairman of the Standards Australia Committee BD32 on Composite Structures and a member of BD90 on Bridge Structures which are developing standards on Steel and Composite Structures for buildings and bridges respectively. He also serves on BD01 and BD02 for Steel and Concrete Structures respectively.

He has been the Chairman of the Australia Regional Group of the Institution of Structural Engineers since 2012 and Chair for the Australian Group of the International Association of Bridge and Structural Engineering (IABSE) since 2015. He is a Fellow of Engineers Australia (FIEAust), American Society of Civil Engineers (FASCE), The Institution of Civil Engineers (FICE); The Institution of Structural Engineers (FIStructE) and International Association of Bridge and Structural Engineering (FIABSE).

Professor Brian Uy, The University of Sydney, Australia

Abstract

Behaviour and design of steel and composite structures for the circular construction economy

Professor Brian Uy, The University of Sydney, Australia

This paper will present aspects of the behaviour and design of steel and composite structures that support the circular construction economy. It will focus on the broad categories of bridge and building infrastructure and the past, present and future practices.

In particular the issue of the reduction, reuse, recycling and rethinking (4 Rs) as it applies to the use of steel in steel and composite infrastructure will be addressed. Particular focus will be made in the paper in looking at connections in steel and composite infrastructure in addressing the 4 Rs. In addition the issue of advanced materials, particularly for steel and concrete for beams, columns, joints, slabs and systems will be a focal point for the paper. The paper will conclude with some salient examples of these advances as they have been addressed in American, Australian and European Codes of Practice.

Effectiveness of productivity improvement strategies in boosting overall project performance

Professor Florence Y.Y. Ling, Professor, Department of Building, School of Design & Environment (SDE), National University of Singapore

Professor Florence Y.Y. Ling is the first and only female professor in SDE. Her research is in project management and international construction, focusing on performance improvement and competitiveness. She has published more than 130 international refereed journal papers. She teaches a course in Project Cost Management. Her administrative portfolio includes handling student life matters at the Office of the Provost and overseeing the Masters who manage residential colleges.

Professor Ling is a Fellow of the Singapore Institute of Surveyors and Valuers (SISV), and a Member of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). She is an elected member of the SISV Council (Quantity Surveying) since 2005. She is also a member of the Pacific Association of Quantity Surveyors Research Committee. She has been appointed to committees in Singapore government agencies such as Ministry of Manpower, Appeals Board (Land Acquisition), Ministry of Law, and Ministry of National Development.

Professor Florence Y.Y. Ling, School of Design & Environment, National University of Singapore

Abstract

Effectiveness of productivity improvement strategies in boosting overall project performance

Florence Y.Y. Ling, Professor, Department of Building, Associate Provost, Office of the Provost, National University of Singapore and John J.H. Tan, Building and Construction Authority, Singapore

Low construction productivity has been a cause for concern and many countries have in place different policies and measures to improve it. These include adopting buildable design and constructible building methods, embracing technology, implementing Building Information System (BIM) and process improvements, and developing the workforce. The research question is: to what extent do these productivity improvement measures boost overall project performance? The objective of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of productivity improvement strategies to ascertain if these do indeed enhance project productivity, quality and cost performance.

Data from recently completed public sector projects in Singapore were collected and analysed. The results show that buildable design significantly improves productivity. Constructible building methods significantly improves both productivity and quality. Unexpectedly, when BIM is adopted to a greater extent, productivity tends to be lower. Developing the workforce leads to better quality but no significant improvement in productivity is observed. Based on the findings, recommendations are made on the critical productivity improvement strategies to boost overall project performance.

The impact of real estate redevelopment on nearby property prices: A real option perspective

K. W. Chau, Ronald Coase Centre for Property Rights Research, HKUrbanLab, The University of Hong Kong

Professor K. W. Chau is a currently Chair Professor and Head of the Department of Real Estate and Construction and Director of the Ronald Coase Centre for Property Rights Research at The University of Hong Kong. He is also Honorary President of the Chinese Research Institute of Construction Management (CRIOCM). His main areas of research include housing, urban analysis, real estate finance and economics, real estate price index, construction economics. Most of his works are empirical studies with implications for policy makers and practitioners.

He received the International Real Estate Society Achievement Award in 1999. He founded Asian Real Estate Society in 1996 and served as the first President (1996-7). He also served as President of the International Real Estate Society (2000-1). He was elected as President of the Hong Kong Institute of Surveyors (2009-10) and President of the Chinese Research Institute of Construction Management (2014-17).

Professor K. W. Chau, Chair Professor and Head, Department of Real Estate and Construction, University of Hong Kong

Abstract

The impact of real estate redevelopment on nearby property prices: A real option perspective

A property owner's right, but obligation, to redevelop a property when opportunity arises in is a form of real option. This real option is valuable especially in densely populated areas under rapid social and economic changes. The value of redevelopment real option (RRO) of a property is reflected in its market prices which includes existing use value and RRO. In a densely populated area dominated by multiple ownership, RRO cannot be easily realized due the high cost land assembly or obtaining consensus from all owners. These costs can be categorised as transaction costs.

There are many instances of old and dilapidated areas surrounded modern buildings in major cities around the world. This appeared to be a form of market failure and often called for government intervention in the form of public sector led urban renewal where the public sector redevelopment agency is empowered by law to resume old properties at reasonable market prices. Much research suggest that public sector redevelopment can lead to Pareto gains due to its ability unlock the ROO of old buildings and the positive externalities of urban renewal projects.

This paper hypothesize that public sector led redevelopment also pose negative impact on nearby old buildings since an area's priority for public-sector led urban renewal will decline substantially soon after a public sector redevelopment project in the vicinity of the redevelopment project. However is not the case for private sector redevelopment projects. Empirical data from Hong Kong is consistent with this hypothesis.

Acknowledgments

We gratefully acknowledge the financial support provided by the GRF of the Research Grant Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Project Reference Number: 17200714).

The Change of Labor Cost and the Innovation of Technology Redefine the Construction: the evidence from China and Australia

Professor Guiwen Liu, School of Construction Management and Real Estate, Chongqing University, China

Dr Guiwen Liu is the dean and professor of the School of Construction Management and Real Estate, Chongqing University, China. His main research interests include construction innovation and industrialization, urban renewal and value management. He was awarded PhD in 2003 in the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. He was the head of international affairs office from 2013-2015 at Chongqing University.

He is now the vice president of CRIOCM. He is selected as the member of the national steering committee of the master education in engineering management and the national assessment committee of the high education in engineering management of China. He believes in the research and professional applications nourish and enhance each other. He has published over 100 papers and 4 books. Many of his works have implications for policy makers and professionals in China.

Professor Guiwen Liu, School of Construction Management and Real Estate, Chongqing University, China

Abstract

The Change of Labor Cost and the Innovation of Technology Redefine the Construction: the evidence from China and Australia

Traditionally, the construction industry is defined as the labor-intensive economic section. However, increasing labor costs and technology innovation have significantly changed the fundamental characteristics of the traditional construction industry.

How to redefine the construction industry is discussed in the context of the present rapid change of the external environment and inherent essence of the industry. Based on the study of the change of labor cost and technology innovation in Chain and Australia, the presentation explores driving forces of the change of the labor cost and the choice of technology. The potential influence caused by the change on the international construction market also be addressed.

System dialectics of low or zero carbon building

Dr Wei Pan, Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong

Dr Wei Pan is Associate Professor and Executive Director elect of Centre for Innovation in Construction and Infrastructure Development (CICID) of The University of Hong Kong (HKU) where he also co-Chairs the Low Carbon Construction (LCC) Taskforce. He specialises in sustainable construction engineering and management, with a research focus on zero carbon building, sustainable development, prefabrication, modular construction, and productivity, having secured over HK$25million in research funding and authored over 140 publications.

He received his BSc (outstanding) in Civil Engineering from Hunan University, and MSc (distinction) in Construction Project Management and PhD in Construction Management from Loughborough University. Dr Pan is the HKU Overseas Fellowship Awardee 2015 and Visiting Academic to Imperial College London. He has supervised and is supervising over 50 researchers.

He has over 22 years of professional experience in Asia and Europe in building design and engineering, construction project management and innovation management, sitting on a number of government and industry boards and committees. Dr Pan is leading the Hong Kong Zero Carbon Partnership. He is a Chartered Builder, Chartered Environmentalist, and Fellow of Higher Education Academy.

Dr Wei Pan, Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong

Abstract

System dialectics of low or zero carbon building

Anthropogenic climate change is grounded on abundant alleged evidence and is taken as a proposition for this keynote. Buildings worldwide contribute to at least one third of energy use and carbon emissions, addressing which many governments have established policy and/or initiatives for low or zero carbon building (L/ZCB). However, despite the burgeoning body of knowledge of L/ZCB, there is little research into it in a systems manner. Limited previous studies held inconsistent approaches. Successful delivery of L/ZCB requires far more than a technological solution per se, but well addressed socio-political contexts, whilst systematizing research into L/ZCB challenges traditional approaches but requires innovative theories and techniques.

This keynote explains the need for systematizing the research into L/ZCB and elaborates the innovative theories and techniques drawing on the past five years of research into L/ZCB at the Low Carbon Construction Taskforce of The University of Hong Kong. Analyzing L/ZCB as complex socio-technical systems, dialectical systems theory is proposed, which explains the interdependence among the elements of the systems. The ‘socio’ system in this context is understood to cover the broad spectrum of socio-cultural, political, regulatory and economic systems. The ‘technical’ system covers the technological system and its development and diffusion within the ‘socio’ contexts. ‘Dialectical systems theory’ here applies the law of requisite holism, as a realistic ground between the scientifically impossible total system (full, real holism) and the practically often dangerous one-viewpoint system (fictitious holism). Adopting the requisite holism, the stakeholders of L/ZCB form their decisions drawing on their perceptions, attitudes and practices within the environments of the socio-technical systems.

The keynote, having elaborated the dialectical systems theory, reviews the concept and theory of L/ZCB and examines evidence of over 600 empirical building cases of L/ZCB collated over the world. The statistics of analyses reveal six clusters of the L/ZCBs and identify a significant gap in the knowledge and practice which is high-rise buildings in hot-and-humid climates. With construction moving towards more adoption of automation and robotic technologies, research into carbon emissions of L/ZCB also faces challenges in its theory and methodology. There is no recognition of prefabrication in the life cycle of a building, and inconsistent methods for carbon estimation contribute to discrepancy in published results. Different socio-technical contexts render benchmarking of L/ZCB ineffective and learning difficult.

The keynote finally recommends several strategies for furthering the knowledge of L/ZCB. First and foremost, system boundaries of L/ZCB should be made explicit in future studies and benchmarking exercises. Initial modelling is shared. Second, partnership should be established in specific socio contexts to facilitate knowledge sharing and transfer among the demand, supply, regulation and institution sides of stakeholders. Internationally, alliances can be developed for maximized synergies. Third, advanced research should be conducted for a better understanding of high-rise L/ZCB. Smart technologies can support that. All in all, system dialectics lays a solid basis for future L/ZCB research, which in return provides a modern context to develop further the dialectical systems theory.

Towards smart industry in construction: a pathway of converging research

Xiangyu Wang, Woodside Chair, Curtin University

Xiangyu Wang is the Curtin-Woodside Chair Professor for Oil, Gas & LNG Construction and Project Management, and the Director of the Australasian Joint Research Centre for Building Information Modelling (BIM) at Curtin University. He is now serving the Australia Research Council as a member of the ARC College of Experts.

Professor Wang is an internationally recognised leading researcher in the field of construction IT, BIM, lean, visualisation technologies and project management, having obtained about AUD $10 million in research funds and published over 300 peer-reviewed technical papers. He has been the Chair of the Australian National Committee for the International Society in Computing in Civil and Building Engineering.

Professor Wang has presented over 30 keynote speeches at international and industrial conferences on BIM, construction and project management, and VR and AR research and practice. He is the editor-in chief of Visualization in Engineering, an international research journal hosted by Springer-Verlag. His work with Woodside Energy Ltd and other companies won numerous awards, including runner-up of the 2012 Curtin Commercial Innovation Award.

Xiangyu Wang, Woodside Chair, Curtin University

Abstract

Towards smart industry in construction: a pathway of converging research

The world is now in the early stages of the fourth industrial revolution which is bringing together digital and physical systems. Dramatic changes are all around us across all sectors, happening at exponential speed. The vision of tomorrow's project management, as part of the fourth industrial revolution, is highly dynamic, customised and resource-friendly.

Today's project management could become highly integrated and situation-awareness systems with a significant portion of embedded intelligences, where digital systems (e.g. design, information, communication) and physical systems (e.g. machines/equipment, raw materials, labour) are coming together within an "Internet of Everything" where they cooperatively drive construction. Physical resources find their way independently through the logistics and construction processes.

To move towards the vision more effectively, inter-disciplinary approaches are not sufficient but a converging way will replace them. This presentation presents a pathway of converging research that creates an eco-system which integrates industry and academia together. This partially proved pathway is also further underpinned by enumerating a variety of emerging integrations of new business models, disruptive technologies and innovative management philosophies.

Fabricated building and the innovation of project management

Wang Jianting, Vice president, Tianjin Chengjian University

Wang Jianting is Vice president of Tianjin Chengjian University and Professor. He graduated from Nankai University with a PhD in Economics. He is Director of Urbanization and New Rural Construction Research Center, Director of Tianjin green building collaborative innovation center and  Director of Urban Green Development Research Center (Think Tank).

He is also Chairman of Metropolitan Committee of China urban economic society, a Standing director of Urban Science Research Association of China and Chairman of Urban Science Research Association of Tianjin.

Wang Jianting, Vice president of Tianjin Chengjian University

Abstract

Fabricated building and the innovation of project management

Fabricated building is the only way for the construction industry to upgrade and achieve green development, its development not only involves many technical problems, but also puts forward new requirements for project management.

The presentation introduces the rise and development of fabricated building in China, compares between the prefabricated and the traditional architecture, summarizes the characteristics of assembly type building, analyses the opportunity, challenge and new demand brought by assembly building to project management, has put forward the innovative thinking of project management idea, method, system mechanism, policy system and so on, in order to adapt to the development of the fabricated building.

Digital Fabrication: Developing the Future of Construction

Dr Russell Loveridge, Managing Director, NCCR Digital Fabrication, ETH Zurich/NCCR Digital Fabrication, Zürich, Switzerland

Russell Loveridge is Managing Director of the Swiss National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) in Digital Fabrication. He studied civil engineering and architecture, completed his professional degree in Toronto, his MAS Diploma in Architecture at the ETH Zurich, and obtained his doctorate at the EPF Lausanne Switzerland. He has worked professionally in construction and architecture, but also has extensive experience academics and was previously the Research Director at the Laboratory for Architectural Production (LAPA) at the EPFL.

His research investigates advanced fabrication methods, smart materials, and novel construction techniques all with a specific interest on how these emerging technologies affect processes of design.  Since its inception in 2014 Russell has been the Managing Director of the NCCR Digital Fabrication in Zurich. In this role, he and his team are developing one of the largest and most advanced multi-disciplinary research consortiums worldwide that focus on the intricate, complex, and large scale interactions between information, materials, and processes with the goal of changing the way we design and build.

Keynote speaker CRiOCM 2017 conference

Abstract

Digital Fabrication: Developing the Future of Construction

The presentation will highlight selected work of the National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) Digital Fabrication and its investigations into new materials, design methods, assembly systems, new fabrication technologies, and how digitally enabled processes change the possibilities, understanding and the sustainable impact of future construction. The NCCR Digital Fabrication is Switzerland’s initiative to lead the development and integration of digital technologies within the field of architecture.  NCCR Digital Fabrication investigates how computation and new digital technologies are affecting construction. Our research and project work is integrative and multidisciplinary, providing deep comprehensive insight into both the science and design of intelligent and robust digital construction systems.

The challenges of architecture and construction have always been resolved by balancing information, skills, materials and the energy flows so as to produce structure and space in creative and functional compositions. Computation and digitally controlled processes bring new opportunities and possibilities to such challenges, and the skills that are emerging give us the ability to manipulate and work with all three basic construction parameters of material, energy and information.

Emerging Trajectories in Construction 3D Printing

Dr James Gardiner, Lead of Construction 3D print Innovation, The Engineering Excellence Group, Laing O'Rourke, Australia

James Gardiner is Lead of Construction 3D Printing Innovation with the Engineering Excellence Group in Sydney, Laing O'Rourke's innovation lab. He is also co-founder and CTO of FreeFAB a tech company that focuses on Construction 3D Printing (c3Dp) technologies for commercial implementation. James currently has 15 patents pending for a diverse set of 3D Printing systems and enabling technologies/methods. One of these technologies - FreeFAB Wax - started commercial production in April 2017 on the Crossrail project in the UK, currently the largest project in the EU.

His award-winning work in architecture and artificial reefs has been published in print (books, newspapers, magazines, online), TV and exhibited internationally. He also gives regular conference/public lectures and radio interviews. Dr Gardiner previously ran his own architectural practice, Fahn Studio based in Sydney, specialising in emerging digital design, Construction 3D Printing and prefabrication. James is a registered (non-practicing) architect and was awarded a PhD at RMIT University in 2011.

Keynote presenter 2017 CRiOCM

Abstract

Emerging trajectories in Construction 3D Printing

The focus of construction 3D printing is beginning to shift radically from traditional layer based 3D printing, which has dominated for the last 30 years. This shift enables a significant enhancement of capability in 3D printed structures: while concurrently reframing the questions/solutions that will be required to deliver this potential in the near future.

This presentation will explore these emerging trends through discussion of project exemplars, while also reflecting on how this changes the game.