Neuroimaging Facility

Swinburne’s neuroimaging facility is allowing researchers to investigate cognition and brain function with greater accuracy and in more detail than ever before.

Professor Susan Rossell discusses the impact of Swinburne's Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machine and Magnetoencephalograph (MEG) machine for Swinburne researchers.

Swinburne’s state-of-the-art neuroimaging facility is situated in the Advanced Technologies Centre. Using the equipment located in the facility, Swinburne researchers are conducting research in the study of:

  • cognitive function and development
  • mechanisms involved in mental health disorders and neurological conditions.

The facility and equipment can be accessed by Swinburne’s research partners, commercial organisations and researchers outside of Swinburne.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging technique that uses a powerful magnetic field and radio-frequencies to obtain very detailed cross-sectional images inside the body.

Swinburne has the latest Siemens Tim Trio 3T magnet, which allows researchers to obtain high quality images with stunning resolution. The neuroimaging facility has both 12 channel and 32 channel head coils, a neck coil and a range of body coils for brain and spinal imaging.

The MRI system has a full range of peripheral technologies and stimuli presentation devices available, including:

  • MRI compatible 132 channel EEG setup from Neuroscan
  • MRI compatible eye tracking setup from Eyelink
  • range of button boxes and a track ball to allow the collection of motor responses
  • high quality LCD screen to allow the presentation of visual stimuli
  • noise-cancelling headphones to allow the presentation of auditory stimuli
  • dedicated on-site PC with Presentation and E-Prime software licences.

“This technology allows us to detect brain activity much more accurately. As a result we are able to pursue advanced neuroscience research, search for clues to brain function and mental health disorders and gain a much more thorough understanding of brain function.”

Professor Susan Rossell

Deputy Director of Swinburne’s Brain and Psychological Sciences Research Centre and Director of Neuroimaging

Magnetoencephalography (MEG)

Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a safe, non-invasive human brain imaging technique. The MEG scanner measures the very small magnetic fields produced by the active brain using external sensors configured as a hemispherical grid that covers the head.

Swinburne’s neuroimaging facility houses a Neuromag TRIUX, which has a full range of peripheral technologies and stimuli presentation devices available, including:

  • MEG compatible EEG setup from Neuroscan
  • MEG compatible eye tracking setup from Eyelink
  • button box to allow the collection of motor responses
  • video screen to allow the presentation of visual stimuli
  • headphones and speakers to allow the presentation of auditory stimuli
  • dedicated on-site PC with Presentation and E-Prime software licences.

Other neuroimaging equipment and capabilities

  • Electroencephalography (EEG) -  nine laboratories and systems that facilitate adult and infant EEG
  • Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) - two setups including the Magstim 200 with BiStim Controller and the Magstim single pulse
  • Eye tracking – three setups, including the Eyelink II and two of the Eyelink 1000 series
  • Computing facilities for image analysis.