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Biomedical News - Current News

  • Fighting tiny microbes that have the potential to sink a ship

    Fighting tiny microbes that have the potential to sink a ship

    Most of us have seen corrosion, or rust, on metal that has been exposed to the elements, especially in coastal environments, and this can be a big and expensive problem to fix for ship owners and those who maintain port infrastructure.

  • Professor Paul Stoddart - Einstein A Go Go - 6 November 2011

    Professor Paul Stoddart - Einstein A Go Go - 6 November 2011

    Dr Shane is joined in the studio by Dangermouse and Dr Alicia to discuss avian influenza and insect-eye cameras. Guests include Dr Paul Stoddart from the Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Science at Swinburne University of Technology
  • Warning sign

    Warning sign

    Researchers at Swinburne are developing a leading-edge sensor that will help detect and diagnose cancers early, potentially saving many more lives.

  • Tool to detect early-stage tumours

    Tool to detect early-stage tumours

    An optical-fibre sensor that will help detect and diagnose cancers early is being developed by researchers at Swinburne University of Technology

  • Top Engineering Students awarded Prizes

    Top Engineering Students awarded Prizes

    Swinburne's best engineering students were recognised at the annual Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Sciences Prize Giving Ceremony on June 1
  • Smart Glasses: An Alternative to Bionic Eye

    Smart Glasses: An Alternative to Bionic Eye

    Star Trek's Lieutenant Commander Geordi La Forge wore a prosthetic trademark VISOR to help him 'see' much of the electromagnetic spectrum. Australian researchers, working on two different projects on opposite sides of the globe, are working to turn
  • Taking a closer look at cancer

    Taking a closer look at cancer

    Using a unique combination of biology and physics techniques, Swinburne researchers are improving our understanding of cancer on a microscopic scale, the research has shown why some cancerous cells respond to certain medical interventions.

  • Bionic eye hope from a touch of light

    Bionic eye hope from a touch of light

    People cannot see nanoparticles, but nanoparticles may one day help people to see. Microscopic gold nanoparticles fixed to optical nerves and assembled to respond to different laser light wavelengths could become the key to bionic vision

  • Bionic eye hope blends lasers and gold

    Bionic eye hope blends lasers and gold

    A novel approach to restoring sight using a 'bionic eye' is being investigated at Swinburne. The laser stimulation of optic nerves is the focus of this research to develop a vision prosthesis.
  • Nature holds the key - Biomedical Engineering Innovations

    Nature holds the key - Biomedical Engineering Innovations

    Professor McArthur discusses how natural phenomenons can be replicated in science, and then used for medical and engineering applications