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Dr David Sly

Senior Lecturer Clinical Technologies
Molecules to Medicine, Vic Government, Australia; Advanced Certificate in Biological Research Management, The University of Melbourne, Australia; PhD, University of Melbourne, Australia; BSc (Hons), Monash University, Australia; BA, Monash University, Australia

Biography

  • David Sly is Senior Lecturer and Program Manager for the Bachelor of Health Sciences (Biomedical and Clinical Technologies) degree.
  • Dr David Sly has over a decade of experience in research, teaching and leadership. His most recent role was in a hospital-based Department at the University of Melbourne leading students and staff surgeons, scientists, psychologists, audiologists and engineers toward improving cochlear implants and other hearing-enabling technologies and treatments. He was also Deputy Head of Department. His research expertise includes neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, sensory systems, biomedical electronics and mobile medical technology, using approaches ranging from cellular, surgical, neuropharmacological, imaging, neural modelling, MEMs senesors, mobile device platforms and clinical diagnostics.
  • In recent years he has led clinical investigations of hearing loss and hearing technologies for the Australian Defence Force and led research translation and entrepreneurship related to medical technologies. This has included development of mobile headphone and wearable electronics technology on mobile platforms.

Research interests

Neuroscience; Hearing loss; Hearing augmentation; Autonomic neuroscience; Acoustics; Auditory neuroscience; Medical technology; Anxiety disorders; Virtual reality; Augmented reality; Hearables; Medical Diagnostics; 3D audio; Sensory Neuroscience; Neurobiology of Sleep

PhD candidate and honours supervision

Higher degrees by research

Accredited to supervise Masters & Doctoral students as Principal Coordinating Supervisor.

PhD topics and outlines

Anxiety monitoring and management with wearable sensors: Anxiety is the most common mental health condition in Australia. This project explores if wearable physiological sensors can be used to monitor and predict anxiety attacks and whether biofeedback can reduce anxiety responses. Projects may involve the assessment of existing physiological monitoring systems as well as the creation of novel systems using smart mobile platforms (e.g. Apple Watch). 

Augmented-reality 3D hearing: 3-D audio is the next-generation of audio technologies with application in hearing aids, assistive technologies, robotics, education, music, surveillance, movies and virtual reality gaming. These projects would suit students with interests in the physiology and psychology of sound localisation or students interested in the construction of wearable 3D sound technologies.

Hearables: Headphone-worn medical technology: The ear has long been a site of wearable medical technologies such as hearing aids and cochlear implants. This project will develop and test “hearables” which package medical sensors into consumer headphones for monitoring hearing loss, sleep, performance, stress and cardiovascular function. This project would suit students with interests in physiological monitoring or biomedical electronics.

Honours

Available to supervise honours students.

Honours topics and outlines

Anxiety monitoring and management with wearable sensors: Anxiety is the most common mental health condition in Australia. This project explores if wearable physiological sensors can be used to monitor and predict anxiety attacks and whether biofeedback can reduce anxiety responses. Projects may involve the assessment of existing physiological monitoring systems as well as the creation of novel systems using smart mobile platforms (e.g. Apple Watch). 

Augmented-reality 3D hearing: 3-D audio is the next-generation of audio technologies with application in hearing aids, assistive technologies, robotics, education, music, surveillance, movies and virtual reality gaming. These projects would suit students with interests in the physiology and psychology of sound localisation or students interested in the construction of wearable 3D sound technologies.

Hearables: Headphone-worn medical technology: The ear has long been a site of wearable medical technologies, such as hearing aids. This project will develop and test “hearables” that package medical sensors into consumer headphones and focus on hearables for monitoring hearing loss, sleep, performance, stress and cardiovascular function. This would suit students with interests in physiological monitoring or biomedical electronics.

Fields of Research

  • Medical Biotechnology - 100400
  • Neurosciences - 110900
  • Acoustics And Acoustical Devices; Waves - 020301

Teaching areas

Biomedical science;Neuroscience;Medical Devices and Diagnostics;Muscle biophysics;Renal Biophysics;Auditory neuroscience;Physiological signals;Microscopy imaging;Data acquisition;Medical Instrumentation;Biomedical electronics

Publications

Also published as: Sly, David; Sly, D.; Sly, D. J. S.; Sly, David J.; Sly, David James
This publication listing is provided by Swinburne Research Bank. If you are the owner of this profile, contact us to update.

Recent research grants awarded

  • 2016: Hear and See-Through Armour *; Tectonica Australia Fund Scheme

* Chief Investigator