General Information

Overview

Build your confidence to make a difference and benefit from our unique industry partnerships with a 12-month paid work placement as part of your degree. Apply your knowledge and critical thinking into your desired industry and grow your network to mark on the world (and its future) before you graduate. 

Study structure

Successful completion of the Bachelor of Arts (Professional) requires students to complete units of study to the value of 375 credit points. All units of study are valued at 12.5 credit points unless otherwise stated.

  • Full-time study: 100 credit points/eight standard units of study per year

  • Part-time study: 50 credit points/four standard units of study per year

  • One credit point is equivalent to one hour of study per week per semester (including contact hours and private study)

  • See the course planner for an example degree structure.

Climate and Social Justice major units
 
Criminology major units
 
Ethics and Technology major units
 
Indigenous Studies major units
 
Perspectives on Globalisation major units
 
Politics, Power and Technology major units
 
Professional and Creative Writing major units
 
Screen Studies and Popular Culture major units

* Outcome unit – completion demonstrates the attainment of course learning outcomes

Choose from a combination of the following course components to complete 100 credit points of other study. Students may also select elective units (12.5 credit points each). 

A second major can be chosen in addition to your first major and will be named on your testamur certificate. Please note you cannot choose the same major as your first major. 

  • Climate and Social Justice
  • Criminology
  • Indigenous Studies
  • Perspectives on Globalisation
  • Politics, Power and Technology
  • Professional and Creative Writing
  • Screen Studies and Popular Culture

A co-major is a major in a field of study outside this course. You can choose one in addition to a first major. Co-majors will not be named on your testamur certificate however will be shown on your transcript of results.

  • Accounting
  • Advertising
  • Animation
  • Biotechnology
  • Business Analysis
  • Business Analytics and Analysis
  • Computer Science
  • Data Analytics
  • Digital Advertising Technology
  • Entrepreneurship and Innovation
  • Environmental Science
  • Finance
  • Games and Interactivity
  • Human Resource Management
  • Journalism
  • Logistics and Supply Chain Management
  • Management
  • Marketing
  • Media Industries
  • Neuroscience
  • Psychology
  • Public Relations
  • Screen Production
  • Social Media
  • Space Technology
View co-major units

Advanced minors are a structured set of 4 units or 50 credit points in a field of study which builds upon your first major. Advanced minors can only be taken in conjunction with specific majors.

Mental Health Advanced

These recommended elective units can deepen your understanding of your chosen major or an area of interest. A full list of available elective units can be found upon enrolment.

Climate and Social Justice major
  • CRI30010 Youth Justice and Crime
  • HIS10003 Global History
  • INS20002 International Indigenous Perspectives
  • PHI10007 What is Power?
  • PHI10008 Introduction to Ethics
  • PHI30010 Philosophy, Politics and Society
  • POL20019 Digital Justice
  • POL20020 Work in a Globalised World
  • POL30010 The Politics of Public Policy
  • SOC20013 Race, Ethnicity and Migration
  • SOC30013 Global Gender and Sex
     
Criminology major
  • ART10001 Academic Literacies: Situating University Knowledge
  • CHE10007 Introduction to Forensic Science
  • ECO30002 Economic Policy in Society
  • HIS10003 Global History
  • HIS10005 Movements for Social Change
  • HIS20003 Propaganda
  • HIS20009 History, Politics and Human Rights
  • INS10002 Unlearning the Past: Indigenous Australian History
  • JOU20006 Media, Law and Ethics
  • NEU10002 Neuroscience
  • PHI10007 What is Power?
  • PHI10008 Introduction to Ethics
  • PHI20006 Philosophy, Media, Culture
  • PHI30008 Ethics
  • PHI30010 Philosophy, Politics and Society
  • POL30009 Critical Perspectives On Terrorism
  • SOC10004 Sociological Foundations
     
Ethics and Technology major
  • HIS10003 Global History
  • HIS10005 Movements for Social Change
  • HIS20003 Propaganda
  • HIS20009 History, Politics and Human Rights
  • INS20004 Resistance, Activism and Empowerment
  • PHI10007 What is Power?
  • PHI20006 Philosophy, Media, Culture
  • PHI20010 Philosophical Perspectives on Nature and Science
  • PHI20010 Philosophical Perspectives on Nature and Science
  • PHI30009 Environmental Philosophy
  • POL20020 Work in a Globalised World
  • POL30019 Conflict, Justice and Peace
  • SOC10005 Environment and Society: Problems and Solutions
  • SOC10012 Global Perspectives on Modernity
  • SOC30020 Changing our Climate: Past and Future
     
Indigenous Studies major
  • CRI10002 Fundamentals of Criminology
  • CRI20001 Policing: Systems and Practice
  • CRI30002 Corrections: Systems and Practice
  • HIS10003 Global History
  • HIS20003 Propaganda
  • HIS30002 Gender and History
  • HIS30007 War and Peace in the 20th Century
  • HIS30012 History, Politics and Human Rights
  • PHI10007 What is Power?
  • PHI10008 Introduction to Ethics
  • PHI20001 Environmental Philosophy
  • PHI20006 Philosophy, Media, Culture
  • PHI30008 Ethics
  • POL20008 Australian Foreign Policy
  • POL20009 Dictators and Democrats: Comparative Politics
  • POL20010 International Relations and Security Studies
  • POL30009 Critical Perspectives On Terrorism
  • SOC10012 Global Perspectives on Modernity
  • SOC20020 Deviance, Difference & Conformity
     
Professional and Creative Writing major
  • DIG20001 Digital Narratives
  • FTV20005 The Australian Screen
  • FTV30001 Breaking the Screen
  • FTV30005 Hollywood Cinema
  • GAM20004 Writing for Interactive Narratives
  • JOU20006 Media, Law and Ethics
  • MDA10001 Introduction to Media Studies
  • MDA20001 Business of Media
  • MDA20007 Screen Franchising and Innovation
  • MDA20009 Digital Communities
  • MDA20025 National Media in A Globalised World
  • MDA30007 Media and Communications Project B
  • MDA30009 Radio, Audio and Podcasting
  • POL10001 Australian Politics
  • SOC10004 Sociological Foundations
  • SOC20020 Deviance, Difference & Conformity
     
Perspectives on Globalisation major
  • HIS10005 Movements for Social Change
  • HIS20009 History, Politics and Human Rights
  • POL20009 Dictators and Democrats: Comparative Politics
  • POL20016 Contemporary Approaches to Security
  • POL20018 Winners and Losers: The Politics and Ethics of Work
  • POL20019 Digital Justice
  • POL30019 Conflict, Justice and Peace
  • POL30020 Critical Security Studies
  • SOC10014 Popular Culture, Social Change and Technology
     
Politics, Power and Technology major
  • HIS10005 Movements for Social Change
  • HIS20009 History, Politics and Human Rights
  • INS20004 Resistance, Activism and Empowerment
  • POL20018 Winners and Losers: The Politics and Ethics of Work
  • POL20019 Digital Justice
  • POL20020 Work in a Globalised World
  • POL30014 Politics of the Pacific
  • POL30018 Cyber Crime and Security
  • POL30019 Conflict, Justice and Peace
  • POL30022 Borders, Security, and Belonging
  • SOC10014 Popular Culture, Social Change and Technology
     
Screen Studies and Popular Culture major
  • ADV10001 Principles of Advertising
  • COM10007 Professional Communication Practice
  • DIG10004 Digital Video and Audio
  • FTV20005 The Australian Screen
  • FTV30001 Breaking the Screen
  • FTV30005 Hollywood Cinema
  • JOU10004 News Writing
  • JOU20006 Media, Law and Ethics
  • LIT20002 Australian Writing: Mapping Diversity
  • LIT30002 Graphic Narratives: Comics, Graphic Novels, and Manga
  • MDA10001 Introduction to Media Studies
  • MDA10006 Innovation Cultures: Perspectives On Science and Technology
  • MDA10008 Global Media Industries
  • MDA20001 Business of Media
  • MDA20003 Networked Selves
  • MDA20009 Digital Communities
  • MDA20011 Sports/Advertising/Media
  • MDA20014 Media and Social Impact
  • MDA20025 National Media in A Globalised World
  • MDA30006 Media and Communications Project A
  • MDA30007 Media and Communications Project B
  • MDA30009 Radio, Audio and Podcasting

Find more detail about elective units

Learning outcomes

Upon successful completion of the Bachelor of Arts (Professional), graduates will be able to:

  • systematically review and critically evaluate research from a variety of sources to inform their knowledge and conceptual understandings in the humanities and/or social sciences

  • formulate arguments that are fit for purpose and demonstrate an understanding of the relevant theories and evidence in their areas of expertise

  • critically analyse information to generate creative solutions to solve complex problems in the area of humanities and/or social sciences, and understand the importance of interdisciplinarity for generating solutions

  • define and integrate theoretical principles and apply these in their areas of expertise

  • apply knowledge and skills with responsibility and accountability for their own learning and practice, individually and in collaboration with others and in professional settings

  • interpret and communicate ideas, problems and arguments in modes suitable to a range of audiences using a range of media

  • coherently articulate a line of reasoning demonstrating cultural sensitivity and apply a framework to analyse and offer solutions to ethical dilemmas in local and international and professional contexts. 

Career opportunities

As a Swinburne Arts graduate, you’ll be well equipped for a broad range of career outcomes in any industry sector.

You’re likely to find work where employers put a high premium on well-developed skills in conceptual understanding, critical and creative reasoning, communication, collaboration, problem-solving and self-management.

Additionally, you may find career paths where your deep understanding of significant societal issues and knowledge around how to influence social change will be appreciated.

Depending on your study areas, you may find employment in advocacy, advertising, anti-corruption, business, consumer protection, community development, corrections, cultural services, entertainment, human rights, government, indigenous engagement, large multinational organisations, marketing, media and communication, NGO/aid work, public relations, unions, youth services, and writing.

Your career may commence with a graduate program or begin with roles such as: advocate, community development officer, diversity officer, government relations coordinator, intelligence analyst, security assessor, strategic advisor, ethics officer, NGO/aid worker, policy analyst/coordinator, political correspondent, electorate officer, politician, account coordinator, business administrator, support officer, advertising executive, campaign coordinator, volunteer coordinator, communications officer, copywriter, digital content creator, executive assistant, journalist, and marketing officer.

Alternatively, you may continue onto postgraduate study for a career in primary or secondary school teaching, or to specialise at a more advanced level in media and communication, writing, or a business area of interest.

Course rules

To qualify for the award of Bachelor of Arts (Professional), students must complete 375 credit points comprising:

  • Four (4) core units of study (50 credit points)

  • Eight (8) units of study from an Arts discipline major in one of the following: Climate and Social Justice; Criminology; Screen Studies and Popular Culture; Ethics and Technology; Indigenous Studies; Perspectives on Globalisation; Politics, Power and Technology; and Professional and Creative Writing (100 credit points)

  • Four (4) units of study from the Professional Placement Co-Major (100 credit points); and 

  • Ten (10) units of study (125 credit points) comprising a second major, and/or co-major, and/or advanced minor/s, and/or minor/s, and/or electives

Students may not complete more than 125 cps at Introductory Level. A unit of study can only be counted once, where units are shared between majors and/or minors, students must choose an approved alternate.

Academic Progress – Special Requirements

In addition to the standard academic progress rules, this course has the following additional academic progress rules which are established in accordance with Academic Courses Regulation 62(2):

1. A student is classified as 'at risk' of unsatisfactory progress if they:

(a) fail any unit of study

(b) behave in a manner which breaches the Swinburne Student Charter whilst on a professional placement 

(c) are unsuccessful in securing a Professional Placement two months before Week 1 of their final year of study.

2. A student is classified as 'unsatisfactory progress' if they:

(a) fail any unit of study in the next Progress Review period after being classified as being 'at risk'

(b) fail a Professional Placement or Work Experience in Industry unit 

(c) have their professional placement terminated early by an industry partner. In the case of early termination of an industry placement by an industry partner, the student will be deemed as having 'unsatisfactory progress' and a progress review hearing may be convened within 2 weeks of the cessation of the placement.

(d) are unsuccessful in securing a Professional Placement two months before Week 1 of their final semester of study.

Students in this situation may be invited to transfer to an alternative undergraduate course. Students who are identified as having unsatisfactory progress will be subject to the show cause provisions in the Progress Review section of the Academic Progress Policy.

Maximum Academic Credit

The maximum level of credit that can be granted for the Bachelor of Arts (Professional) is 150 credit points (normally 12 units).

Admission criteria

Information about Swinburne's general admission criteria can be found at Admissions at Swinburne - Higher Education webpage.

Entry requirements

A. Applicants with recent secondary education (within past three years)

ATAR

This course uses the ATAR as part of its selection considerations. Guaranteed ATAR: if you receive an ATAR of 80 or higher and meet all the essential requirements for this course, you will be guaranteed an offer.

Educational history

An applicant's entire academic history, including ATAR results, will be considered for entry into this course.

Selection rank adjustments

Selection ranks for this course will be calculated based on your ATAR with adjustments to overall study scores based on subjects studied, location of your home address, SEAS application, and participation In Swinburne's Early Leaders program. For further details about selection rank adjustments, see Admissions at Swinburne.

Subject adjustments

A study score of 25 in any Humanities, Literature or any LOTE equals 2 aggregate points per study. Overall maximum of 15 points. 

Meeting course prerequisites

VCE units 3 and 4: a study score of at least 25 in any English (except EAL) or at least 30 in English as Alternate Language (EAL) or equivalent.

ATAR profile for those offered places wholly or partly on the basis of ATAR in Semester 1 2022

ATAR-Based offers only, across all offer rounds ATAR
Excluding adjustment factors
Selection Rank
ATAR + any adjustment factors
Highest rank to receive an offer 81.65 86.1
Median rank to receive an offer 77.7 82.8
Lowest rank to receive an offer 61.1 72.2

B. Applicants with higher education study

Educational history

This course only accepts applicants who have just completed Year 12 or have not commenced any studies after completing Year 12 (ATAR results from the last seven years can be considered).

Meeting course prerequisites

As for Year 12 or equivalent.

C. Applicants with vocational education and training (VET) study

Educational history

This course only accepts applicants who have just completed Year 12 or have not commenced any studies after completing Year 12 (ATAR results from the last seven years can be considered).

Meeting course prerequisites

As for Year 12 or equivalent.

D. Applicants with work and life experience

Entire academic record

This course only accepts applicants who have just completed Year 12 or have not commenced any studies after completing Year 12 (ATAR results from the last seven years can be considered).

Meeting course prerequisites

As for Year 12 or equivalent.

Student profile

The table below gives an indication of the likely peer cohort for new students in this course. It provides data on students who commenced in this course in the most relevant recent intake period, including those admitted through all offer rounds and international students studying in Australia.

  Semester 1, 2022
Applicant background Number of students Percentage of all students
(A) Higher education study (includes a bridging or enabling course) N/A N/A
(B) Vocational education and training (VET) study N/A N/A
(C) Work and life experience (admitted on the basis of previous achievement not in the other three categories) <5 <5
(D) Recent secondary education:    
Admitted solely on the basis of ATAR (regardless of whether this includes the consideration of adjustment factors such as equity or subject bonus points)
N/P N/P
Admitted where both ATAR and additional criteria were considered (e.g. portfolio, audition, extra test, early offer conditional on minimum ATAR) N/A N/A
Admitted on the basis of other criteria only and ATAR was not a factor (e.g. special consideration, audition alone, schools recommendation scheme with no minimum ATAR requirement)
0 0%
International students 0 0%
All students 7 100%

Notes:"<5" – The number of students is less than 5.
N/A – Students not accepted in this category.
N/P – Not published: the number is hidden to prevent calculation of numbers in cells with less than 5 students.

Interested in the Bachelor of Arts (Professional)?

From state-of-the-art facilities to opportunities to engage with industry – this course is designed with your future in mind. Let's get started.

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