Case studies

At Swinburne University of Technology we have collaborated on research projects with industry, government and research organisations around the world.


An initiative funded by the Diabetes Australia Research Trust and ASX listed company BioPharmica

Dr Paul Stoddart, a research fellow at the Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, has developed a system that could one day be used to constantly monitor blood glucose levels.
Dr Paul Stoddart has developed a system that could be used to monitor blood glucose levels.
Dr Paul Stoddart has developed an optic fibre probe that diabetics will eventually be able to wear in a wristwatch-sized device to constantly monitor blood glucose levels.

Diabetes research breakthrough

Dr Paul Stoddart, a research fellow at the Centre for Quantum and Optical Science (formerly the Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy), has developed a system that could be used to monitor blood glucose levels. The Diabetes Australia Research Trust and BioPharmica funded the initiative.

Dr Stoddart and his group have developed and patented an optic fibre probe that diabetics will eventually be able to wear in a wristwatch-sized device. By gently pressing beneath the skin's surface, blood sugar levels can be monitored more precisely and less invasively than the traditional finger prick test that diabetics currently have to undergo several times a day.

Dr Stoddart's work may lead to further practical implementations of the science, including portable sensors that can detect cyanide, bacteria, nerve agents or toxins in drinking water.